Category Archives: HIS 500

HIS500: History and New Media

Do Artifacts Have Politics?

In this journal article from 1980, Langdon Winner explains different interpretations of the way technologies can have political and social qualities. For instance, when Moses consciously planned and built the overpasses in New York City at an insufficient height for … Continue reading

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Public History on the Web: If You Build It, Will They Come?

In the sixth chapter of Dougherty’s and Nawrotzki’s book, Writing History in the Digital Age, three essays describe different approaches of crowdsourcing to involve communities in the production of history; some of them more successful than others. In the first … Continue reading

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Pox and the City

The last essay in the fifth chapter of Dougherty’s and Nawrotzki’s book, Writing History in the Digital Age, describes the challenges four collaborators had to face when they tried to create a history game. Pox and the City: Edinburgh is … Continue reading

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Only Typing? Informal Writing, Blogging, and the Academy

Part of the seventh chapter of Dougherty’s and Nawrotzki’s book, Writing History in the Digital Age, is an essay by Alex Sayf Cummings and Jonathan Jarrett about blogging in the academic world. Social media, such as WordPress, Wikipedia or Twitter, … Continue reading

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Visualizations and Historical Arguments

The fifth part of Dougherty’s and Nawrotzki’s book, Writing History in the Digital Age, also includes an essay by John Theibault about the role and importance of different types of images for publications. In ‘Visualizations and Historical Arguments’, Theibault argues … Continue reading

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The Wisdom of Crowds(ourcing)

In this second part of Dougherty’s and Nawrotzki’s book, Writing History in the Digital Age, a number of essays dealt with the online publication of historical works. Leslie Madsen-Brooks argued in ‘I Nevertheless Am a Historian’ that historians may have … Continue reading

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Putting Harlem on the Map

  Part of the fifth chapter of Dougherty’s and Nawrotzki’s book, Writing History in the Digital Age, includes an essay by Stephen Robertson, in which he describes the development of the Putting Harlem on the Map project. During the project, … Continue reading

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